The role of a Case Manager

The role of case manager is varied. Here are some area’s CMS can help with.

Benefits & Finances

After a traumatic injury such as brain or spinal cord injury, many people are unable to return to work for a long period of time and some individuals may not be able to work again. When your financial circumstances change this may lead to difficulty paying and prioritising bills. The stress of financial problems may have a devastating effect on your mental wellbeing, your relationship with family and friends, and limit your ability to participate in rehabilitation.  Your Case Manager can help you learn or relearn budgeting skills. You may not have been responsible for the household finances before and need some guidance into dealing with money and bills. You may have difficulty due to a brain injury and find money and bills confusing and frustrating. Working regularly with your Case Manager or a Rehab Assistant on budgeting can help avoid problems with finances arising. Your Case Manager can help you learn or relearn budgeting skills. You may not have been responsible for the household finances before and need some guidance into dealing with money and bills. You may have difficulty due to a brain injury and find money and bills confusing and frustrating. Working regularly with your Case Manager or a Rehab Assistant on budgeting can help avoid problems with finances arising.

Housing

A problem faced by many individuals and families when leaving hospital after a traumatic injury is finding that their home is no longer suitable. Adaptations and equipment may be required in order for you to live in your current home. In some circumstances your previous home may no longer be appropriate therefore alternative housing or purchasing a new property is required.

Support Staff

Many individuals after sustaining a traumatic injury will require some form of support in order to leave hospital or rehabilitation, live independently at home, provide respite for carers, access the community or return to work or education. In cases of severe traumatic injury the individual may require support 24 hours a day including nursing care so that they are able to return home or move to a suitable new home. This can be a daunting process for families and carers to know who to turn to turn to provide this care. In other cases where there is less severe injury the individual may require a support worker for a few hours a week to assist with attending a gym, support group or work placement. Again it can be difficult to know how to access support and whether you should use an agency or employ your own support worker.

Education

At CMS we work with people of all ages and have experience of liaising with education establishments from nursery through to university. Traumatic injury can impact on your education in many ways; babies born with cerebral palsy may have some form of learning disability or difficulty which may require additional support during early developmental years and throughout their school life. A child or adult may be absent from school or further education for a long period of time due to rehabilitation after a spinal cord injury or brain injury. Those who have sustained a brain injury may have further problems returning to education due to reduced concentration, poor memory and fatigue.

Employment

CMS aims to provide support, encouragement and information for individuals returning to work, education or volunteering following a traumatic Injury. Many people face barriers as a result of their injury. These include; Physical limitations, lack of insight, lack of professional input and negative attitudes. CMS offers support try to overcome these difficulties and will help you to look for work, training, further education and vocational opportunities.

Benefits of Returning to Work;

  • Returning to work enables you to earn an income
  • Provides you with social interactions
  • Individuals who return to work may feel more satisfied and fulfilled within their life

Volunteering

When paid employment is no longer possible is another option. The benefits of volunteering include;
  • Participating in meaningful activity
  • Opportunity to develop new skills
  • Contact with employers could lead to future employment

Getting out and about

Following injury you may have experienced problems with transport. You may have been told you are unable to drive or have been told you cannot drive for a period of time, therefore need to rely on public transport which can start to present problems. Public transport can be expensive if used regularly and you may be living on a low income. You may live in a remote area with poor transport available. You may struggle to use the transport in your area due to lack of adapted buses to allow wheelchair users or other individuals with reduced mobility. Your case manager can help by: teaching you to use strategies that can help with journey planning and finding your way explore other means of transportation, explore funding options to assist with travel costs and help with anxiety if you are anxious using public transport.

Health and Wellbeing

Promoting health and wellbeing following a traumatic injury is an important aspect within the rehabilitation process. Incorporating sports and fitness within your weekly routine can be instrumental in maintaining both psychological and physical wellbeing. Participating in sports can utilise and assist the individual to develop or relearn to use physical skills that may have been lost due to injury. This can be achieved within your own home or in a social setting. After a traumatic injury exercise and fitness is important, performing daily stretches and exercises can help maintain and improve the following;
  1. Blood circulation
  2. Muscles in paralysed limbs
  3. Range of movement
  4. Prevents pressure sores
  5. Balance and co-ordination
  6. Enhance functional capacity
  7. Mood
  8. Energy
  9. Self-esteem
  10. Strength and stamina
  11. Digestion
  12. Bladder control
A case manager can assist in identifying appropriate leisure opportunities or sports facilities in your area; set up a regular exercise programme if appropriate

Hobbies & Interest

Many individuals after a traumatic injury lose interest in their hobbies and leisure activities. This can be as a result of lack of motivation, decreased confidence, limited concentration, frustration and feeling unable to take part in previous interests and hobbies

How CMS can help?

  • Source leisure activities and hobbies in your area
  • Provide you with a rehab assistant to assist you to participate in new hobbies and interests
  • Recommend assistive technology or equipment to enable you to return to previous hobbies/ interests.
  • Accompany you to new groups, clubs and support services
  • Help plan transportation and journeys to access various hobbies and interests

Holidays

Following a traumatic injury going on holiday is something that many people find as a huge task. Individuals may feel restricted with the choice of holidays available to them. People who require support services are often visiting respite services in the UK. At CMS we look at all options available to the individual in the UK and abroad.

How CMS can help?

  • Search holiday destinations
  • Source accessible accommodation
  • Assist to arrange the provision of support staff if required
  • Liaise with insurance companies
  • Liaise with holiday companies
  • Plan your travel to the destination
  • Source holidays tailored to suit each individual’s needs.

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